• The Need For Enhanced Control Strategies In Biopharma And Biosimilar Production
    The Need For Enhanced Control Strategies In Biopharma And Biosimilar Production

    For many years, the pharmaceutical industry  meant “small (usually synthetic) molecules” mixed with various non-active materials and put into capsules or, in the old days, rolled into pills or pressed into tablets. While synthesizing the APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients), formulating the dosage forms, and analyzing the materials at every step of the life cycle was not always trivial, it was relatively straightforward.

  • Purification Of Antibodies With Hydrophobic Anion Exchange Resin
    Purification Of Antibodies With Hydrophobic Anion Exchange Resin

    A hydrophobic anion exchange mixed-mode resin has been developed to overcome challenges in antibody purification. This application note describes the purification of acidic and basic antibodies using this mixed-mode chromatography resin through bind-elute and flow-through modes of purification.

  • Best Practices For A Successful Bioprocess Technology Transfer
    Best Practices For A Successful Bioprocess Technology Transfer

    A well-executed bioprocess technology transfer (tech transfer) is critical to ensure smooth knowledge transfer and optimal process reproducibility. If not executed properly, you risk reducing the quality and efficiency of your process. Waste time trouble shooting, and you may delay your time to market. In today’s global markets effective tech transfer is critical.

  • Understanding And Controlling Raw Material Variation In Cell Culture Media
    Understanding And Controlling Raw Material Variation In Cell Culture Media

    An organized effort across biopharma, including drug substance manufacturers and suppliers, is needed to address and meet the needs of industry regarding raw material quality and consistency.

  • A Second Reformation: Returning Biosimilar Regulations To Scientific Roots
    A Second Reformation: Returning Biosimilar Regulations To Scientific Roots

    In light of BioApproval's Chris Webster’s recent publication and future presentation at the upcoming DIA Biosimilars conference, I spoke with him to learn more about the "Confirmation of Sufficient Likeness" approach and the scientific evidence that has informed this proposed biosimilar regulatory paradigm shift away from Totality of Evidence.

  • Partnership Brings A Better Film For Single-Use Bioprocessing
    Partnership Brings A Better Film For Single-Use Bioprocessing

    As the impact of extractables and leachables on product stability gained greater visibility in relation to single-use technology (SUT), GE Healthcare and Sealed Air formed a partnership to address the issues with the current film structures in today’s biopharma market. 

  • Asia Bioprocessing Capacity Trends: Overall Growth, But Cell Therapy Shortages Loom
    Asia Bioprocessing Capacity Trends: Overall Growth, But Cell Therapy Shortages Loom

    Overall, the growth in Asia’s bioprocessing capacity, particularly in China, has been impressive, albeit from a low baseline. Capacity growth over the past five years has been over 20 percent annually. New facility construction and expansions reflect the demand for biologics for domestic consumption, while other facilities are beginning to develop manufacturing strategies for GMP production for major markets, with capacity involving commercial-scale stainless steel and single-use bioreactors.

  • Purposeful Design And Development Of A Next-Generation Single-Use Bioprocess Film
    Purposeful Design And Development Of A Next-Generation Single-Use Bioprocess Film

    Fortem film development is an important investment by GE Healthcare, as it helps meet the industry need for a fully characterized platform film across all bioprocessing applications with supply chain transparency as a focal point. 

  • FDA, USP Debate Standards: How Could This Impact Biosimilars?
    FDA, USP Debate Standards: How Could This Impact Biosimilars?

    Even though the FDA has argued quite passionately against the need for biologics standards, there are several reasons why I hesitate to embrace their arguments that having these standards in place (and requiring they be met) could be harmful to biosimilars.

  • Applications For Single-Use Systems In Biosimilar Development
    Applications For Single-Use Systems In Biosimilar Development

    Exploring the benefits, challenges, and future of disposable systems in biosimilar manufacturing.

  • The Debate On Standards In Biologics Development Heats Up
    The Debate On Standards In Biologics Development Heats Up

    Though it’s only natural to expect animated scientific discussion between the FDA and USP which have long been partners-in-science, I found myself caught off-guard by just how firmly the FDA has been putting its foot down and making its thoughts known on the role certain standards — in particular, USP monographs — should (or should not play) in biologics development.

  • Securing Bioprocess Film Supply
    Securing Bioprocess Film Supply

    Learn how a partnership built on technical expertise and trust is helping to secure the supply of a single-use film built for bioprocessing.

  • Viral Clearance: 7 Chromatography Column Considerations
    Viral Clearance: 7 Chromatography Column Considerations

    Viral clearance studies are a critical part of the production of biologics. However, performing studies that are accurate and cost-effective can be challenging. Here are seven things to consider while performing your next chromatography viral clearance study.

  • USP Highlights Biosimilar Analytical Development Challenges, Possibilities
    USP Highlights Biosimilar Analytical Development Challenges, Possibilities

    During our conversation about the FDA’s most recent comparability guidance, I picked one USP expert's brain about the challenges of establishing a biosimilar analytical development program, as well as why certain types of data may be more difficult to come by than others. These challenges are responsible for further complicating the question about which types of data are still necessary, and why.  

  • FDA’s “Show Me The Data” A Recipe For Tailored Biosimilar Development?
    FDA’s “Show Me The Data” A Recipe For Tailored Biosimilar Development?

    In this first of what will be a two-part article, USP's Fouad Atouf highlights the challenges presented by the FDA’s newest guidance while remaining optimistic that the large amount of data recommended today will open doors to more efficient development in the (hopefully) near future.

More From Biosimilar Manufacturing solution center

ABOUT BIOSIMILAR MANUFACTURING

Biosimilars are considered to be low-cost substitutions for pricy, large-molecule biologics. However, biosimilars must meet the same quality, safety, and efficacy as their reference biologic. Manufacturing biosimilars requires a more complicated procedure than that of manufacturing small molecule generics. Companies manufacturing biosimilars are focused on creating a chemical structure that is as close as possible to that of the reference product. Failure rates and operational costs pose a challenge for those companies involved in manufacturing biosimilars compared to those manufacturing small molecule generics.

Small molecule generics are created using the same active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and, therefore, are chemically identical to that of the originator medicine. The manufacturing process for small molecules comprises only one-fifth of the total in-process tests required to meet Good Manufacturing Practice compared to that of biologic medicines (50 vs. 250 in-process tests). In fact, the manufacturing process for a large molecule is so complex, it cannot be duplicated by two different manufacturers, as the cells used in biologic medicines are unique to the company manufacturing each biologic.

Manufacturing a biologic consists of genetically modifying a cell, which becomes the basis for a cell line used for the production of the necessary protein for the biologic medicine. The protein is then separated from the cells and purified. Biosimilars are created from small alterations to the manufacturing process which creates a molecule that is not identical but closely resembles the reference product. While the differences in the biosimilar molecule might be slight, these changes in the manufacturing process of a biosimilar can affect the efficacy and safety of a biosimilar compared to the reference biologic. Over the past decade, the manufacturing process for proteins has become more standardized and the required technology has become increasingly accessible, leading to reductions in biosimilars production costs. As a result, a greater number of companies have begun manufacturing biosimilars, while reference brand manufacturers are setting their sights on bolstering pipelines and manufacturing biobetters to maintain market share for their soon-to-be-off-patent reference products.